Important Things

Matters of great significance, as noted by the most casual of observers.
humansofnewyork:

"My father never liked me. The last time I saw him, I hid from him. We both went to visit my grandmother at the same time. When I heard that he was on his way, I hid beneath the staircase, and I watched his back as he walked away. I never saw him again. My sister was with him when he died. She says he cried a lot."

humansofnewyork:

"My father never liked me. The last time I saw him, I hid from him. We both went to visit my grandmother at the same time. When I heard that he was on his way, I hid beneath the staircase, and I watched his back as he walked away. I never saw him again. My sister was with him when he died. She says he cried a lot."

asylum-art:

Martin Wittfooths Beautiful and Disturbing Paintings of Animals in Post-Apocalyptic Settings

Martin Wittfooth’s intensely allegorical paintings all suggest the future of the human condition — without showing a single person. The Brooklyn-based painter has transcended the illustrative genre and entered into the realm of modern masterworks, using a time-honored painterly tradition that may be painstaking, but reveals incredible depth in both medium and content. His paintings are haunting in that they have a feeling of real possibility. The familiar scenes hint of dystopia and disrepair; their animal subjects are beautiful, but also betray that something in this world is amiss. In light of the long-awaited recognition and acceptance of climate change, Wittfooth’s work has an undercurrent of forewarning about what could happen if humans don’t get our act together. We spoke to the artist about his post-apocalyptic vision, classic style, and the  of using animals instead of people as subjects.

(via annaphylaxis503)

Writers don’t make any money at all. We make about a dollar. It is terrible. But then again we don’t work either. We sit around in our underwear until noon then go downstairs and make coffee, fry some eggs, read the paper, read part of a book, smell the book, wonder if perhaps we ourselves should work on our book, smell the book again, throw the book across the room because we are quite jealous that any other person wrote a book, feel terribly guilty about throwing the schmuck’s book across the room because we secretly wonder if God in heaven noticed our evil jealousy, or worse, our laziness. We then lie across the couch facedown and mumble to God to forgive us because we are secretly afraid He is going to dry up all our words because we envied another man’s stupid words. And for this, as I said, we are paid a dollar. We are worth so much more.

—Donald Miller (via writingquotes)

(via altromondo)

asylum-art:

"atomic overlook" series by clay lipsky

Clay Lipsky born 1974 is a fine art photographer and Emmy Award winning graphic designer based in LA. Hi has applied his unique visual style across variety of mediums, from print and multimedia, to tv, music videos and film. Despite his varied interests, photography has always been a part of Clay’s life.

(via thecityofroses)